ARTIST TALK: The Ambiguity of Aesthetic Choices by Paulina Korobkiewicz

Join me for my talk at the London Institute of Photography on Friday, 4th October at 7pm. I will be speaking about my practice and showing selected photographs from recent projects. Tickets are £3, book your place here.

4th October 2019, 7 – 9pm

£3 (free for our PPC students)

Address:
London Institute of Photography
Old Truman Brewery
91 Brick Lane
London, E1 6QL

Photobook.Storytelling Exhibition by Paulina Korobkiewicz

24 May - 14 June 2019

The show is a part of the series that focuses on various aspects of the photobook. A carefully designed exhibition presents the most interesting samples of the photobooks from the Visegrad region, that have been made out of the need to convey, usually a personal, story. Most of the presented works are either self-published or published in small editions, including hand-made or low-cost printed zine publications.

Presented artists

Tabori Andras, Ewa Behrens, Eva Benkova, Stanislav Briza, Radek Brousil, Jan Brykczynski, Magda Buczek, Kateřina Držková, Peter Fabo, Viola Fátyol, Lucia Gamanová, Aurélia Garová, Agnieszka Gotowała, Anna Hornik, Tomoya Imamura, Zuzana Ivašková, Tereza Kabůrková, Ines Karčáková, Joanna Margaret Kischka , Deana Kolencikova, Jan Kolský , Viktor Kopasz, Paulina Korobkiewicz, Andrea Kurjakova, Alicja Łabądź, Katarzyna Ewa Legendź , Tomasz Liboska, Michal Loba, Maciej Moskwa , Boris Németh, Anna Orłowska, Krzysiek Orłowski, Ivana Paleckova, Marcin Plonka, Igor Pisuk, Piotr Pytel, Krzysztof Racoń, Kaja Rejczel Rata, Anka Sielska, Jakub Stanek, Juraj Starovecký, Dorota Stolarska, Eva Szombat, Budha Tamás, Jiri Thyn, Balázs Varju Tóth, Ondrej Urban, Imrich Veber, Doroteya Veykon , Ján Viazanička, Lukasz Wierzbowski , Karolina Wojtas, Adrian Wykrota, Ficsór Zsolt, Kasia Zolich, KWAS Karolina Wojtas, Agnieszka Sejud)

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Image courtesy Fresh From Poland

Image courtesy Fresh From Poland

Hybrid Prophecy Panel Discussion by Paulina Korobkiewicz

I will be speaking with Polish artist Kle Mens and curators Elaine Tam and Ryan Lanji at REJEKT Gallery. We'll be discussing Kle Mens's exhibition, her work and its themes.

Saturday, 15 June @ 3pm

82a Commercial Street, London E1 6LY3

In her first UK solo show, Kle Mens makes a brave incantation, summoning both religious martyrs and mythological hybrids to evoke the formidable force of female transformation, which underlies all her work. In a relational gesture of self- sacrifice, paint becomes embodied flesh, a profound moment of ekstasis propelling her into the temporality of long- standing religious order, a remark upon the continued urgency of feminist concerns. With similar spirit, she investigates the unusual, always-timeliness of the apocalypse — the recurring crisis of individual, collective and planetary future that haunts existence. Kle Mens presents us with this provocation: a Hybrid Prophecy that sees her assuming new bodies and fictions, while persisting with the religious iconography that she is passionately indebted to. With this, Kle Mens continues her elegant foray into mythic territories, their power and their promise.

Paperlust Photobook Fest by Paulina Korobkiewicz

Perspectives selected for Photobook. Storytelling exhibition, as a part of the first edition of Paperlust Photobook Fest, created by Fresh From Poland & Paper Beats Rock.

https://www.facebook.com/events/2208677216039547/

Book as a fulfilment of a dream about the narrative.

The show is a part of the series that focuses on various aspects of the photobook. A carefully designed exhibition presents the most interesting samples of the photobooks from the Visegrad region, that have been made out of the need to convey, usually a personal, story. Most of the presented works are either self-published or published in small editions, including hand-made or low-cost printed zine publications.

A book, as depicted in the show, becomes the means for communicating one’s personal experience, a cultural experience and the same time becomes an instrument protecting such experience from oblivion. The leitmotiv of a narration underlines the role of the recipient as an active participant/interpreter of the work of art.

Low-cost self-publishing is here a starting point for a polemic about the nature of the medium. The dissemination using the most economic and least demanding means gives it the power of an independent statement. The questions asked by the authors are an attempt to reflect on the phenomena of this type of publications on the Central European market, their role, ways of production and presentation, as well as expectations of the recipient.
(Fresh From Poland)

Perspectives, 2017

Perspectives, 2017

TIMES AND DATES

24 May - 14 June 2019

Tue-Fri - 16:00 - 19:00
Sat-Sun - 12:00 - 16:00

Private View 25 May 2019 18:00

Fundacja Sztuki Nowej ZNACZY SIĘ

Kościuszki 37, 30-105 Kraków

Prix Pictet 2018 HOPE by Paulina Korobkiewicz

I am honoured to announce I have been nominated for Prix Pictet 2018. The theme for the eighth cycle of the award is Hope.

Founded in 2008 by the Pictet Group, the Prix Pictet has become the world’s leading award for photography and sustainability. The award plays to a global audience of over 400 million. 

The shortlist will be announced at Les Rencontres d’Arles in July 2019 and the winner at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London in November 2019.

From the Heart of Europe by Paulina Korobkiewicz

GROUP SHOW

Galerie Ernst Hilger: From the Heart of Europe

Participating artists: Daniele Buetti, Maria Bussmann, Gunter Damisch, Oliver Dorfer, Alfred Hrdlicka, Paulina Korobkiewicz, Andreas Leikauf, Oswald Oberhuber, Hans Staudacher and Miha Strukelj.

PRIVATE VIEW

Wednesday 12 December, 6 – 9pm


TIMES AND DATES

7 - 22 December 2018

Tuesday – Saturday, 11 – 6pm

Free entry

Bermondsey Project Space

183-185 Bermondsey St, London SE1 3UW

VIA ARTS PRIZE 2018 by Paulina Korobkiewicz

I am thrilled to be joining the VIA Arts Prize judging panel this year, alongside with Irene Due, James Nicholls, Ting-Tong Chang, Kiki Mazzucchelli, Sumantro Ghose and Will Sorrell.

The VIA Arts Prize is London’s bespoke visual Ibero-American themed arts competition. It is organised by the Embassies of Latin America, Spain and Portugal and is hosted annually at the Embassy of Brazil in London, in its impressive Sala Brasil gallery.

The Prize is judged every year by an impressive Jury, comprising 6 high-profile personalities from the Arts world, who combine expertise from the areas of curating and practicing art, as well as academia and cultural journalism.

2018 Finalists Exhibition and Solo Show by Susan Phillips, 2017 winner of the Prize, will run from 14th December until 31st January.

Sala Brasil, Embassy of Brazil

14-16 Cockspur Street, London, SW1Y 5BL

The Calvert Journal: Take me home. Eastern Europe through the eyes of a new generation by Paulina Korobkiewicz

FINAL WEEK: Selected photographs from Disco Polo series are still on display at Calvert 22 as a part of 'Post Soviet Visions: image and identity in the new Eastern Europe', 23 Feb - 15 April.

Find out more about the exhibition via The Calvert Journal, words by Anastasia FedorovaRead the article here.

'The study of unique architectural settings is one of the main preoccupations of the new generation of photographers from eastern Europe. At the same time, the visual narrative they construct goes much further than just documentation. It’s not about capturing the existing space, but about contributing to the ever-shifting character of the environment. In her project Disco Polo, Paulina Korobkiewicz studies the urban aesthetics of eastern Poland after 1989, focusing on the peculiar signs of its transition to global capitalism. Plastic palm trees make streets into a globalist non-place. A patchwork of colourful advertising and pastel shades over tower block architecture illustrates the contemporary collision of influences from East and West.'

Post Soviet Visions: image and identity in the new Eastern Europe by Paulina Korobkiewicz

Disco Polo is on display at Calvert 22 at 'Post Soviet Visions: image and identity in the new Eastern Europe' group exhibition exploring new visual representations of lifestyle and landscape in Eastern Europe, until 15 April.

Featuring: Armen Parsadanov, David Meskhi, Dima Komarov, Genia Volkov, Grigor Devejiev, Hassan Kurbanbaev, Ieva Raudsepa, Jedrzej Franek, Masha Demianova, Michal Korta, Patrick Bienert and Max von Gumppenberg, Paulina Korobkiewicz, and Pavel Milyakov.
 

Second edition of Disco Polo photo-book is available from the Calvert 22 Bookshop

Wallpaper* Magazine: An exhibition of post-Soviet photography brings light where there was darkness by Paulina Korobkiewicz

‘Post-Soviet Visions: Image and Identity in the New Eastern Europe’, a new exhibition at the Calvert 22 Foundation’s gallery space in East London, takes in the work of other young photographers across the former Soviet Union and its satellite states. And in much of their work you can see the same ambiguous, impressionistic take on post-Soviet possibility.

The foundation, which also runs online magazine The Calvert Journal, is dedicated to looking at contemporary culture and creativity in what it calls the ‘New East’. And the exhibition, says Calvert 22’s creative director Ekow Eshun, comes out of that conversation. What is marked in pretty much all the works is not nihilism and despair, but rather improvised opportunity. ‘The show is about how these artists imagine and create space,’ Eshun says. For curator Anastasiia Fedorova, ‘it’s also about youth, and youth in historical context, how the 26 years since the collapse of the USSR is a whole life for the new generation. Just like youth, this historical transition is also about growing pains, empathy and ecstasy, and the restless identity search.’

Written by: Nick Compton

Read the article here

The Guardian: Post-Soviet Visions exhibition - in pictures by Paulina Korobkiewicz

Disco Polo features in Post-Soviet Visions: image and identity in the new Eastern Europe’, group show curated by Ekow Eshun and Anastasiia Fedorova

Read the article here.

'Post-Soviet Visions: image and identity in the new Eastern Europe is a photography show exploring new visual representations of lifestyle and landscape in eastern Europe. The exhibition gathers the work of a young generation of artists rising to prominence a quarter-century after the end of Communism. It opens on 23 February at Calvert 22 space in London.'

It's Nice That: Post-Soviet Visions by Paulina Korobkiewicz

‘Post-Soviet Visions: image and identity in the new Eastern Europe’ is a group show of photography exploring new visual representations of lifestyle and landscape in Eastern Europe. The exhibition, that opens at the Calvert 22 Space in London this week, gathers the work of a young generation of artists rising to prominence a quarter century after the end of Communism. Here we speak to the curators Ekow Eshun and Anastasiia Fedorova about the ideas behind the show and to select some of their favourite photographers involved.'

Read the article here.

Eastern Europe has often been overlooked and under explored in the West. We tend to think about it as grey and drab, as if it is still sunk in the Cold War.  But there’s a cultural dynamism to the place right now coming through in everything from fashion to art to film.

The show gathers works from photographers in Georgia, Latvia, Poland, Russia, Ukraine and Uzbekistan.  Although the personal circumstances of these photographers may differ, they share a common past: either they themselves, or their parents, grew up in countries that once existed under communist rule. Against the complicated politics of many of those countries, there’s a generational wave of creativity that is really thrilling to see.

With the show we’re interested in how people live and look and connect with each other; how they construct their identity as citizens of relatively recently independent nations and how they make sense of their own place against the complicated past of their country. For example, the relationship between photography and architecture in the show is very important. Communist-era buildings and monuments loom over many post-Soviet cities today. It’s very hard to walk through Moscow or Kiev or many other cities without encountering these domineering structures. They are a reminder of the power and control that an overbearing system tried to exert on its citizens. At the same time, history isn’t static. What’s interesting to explore, is how people now put some of these buildings to use and how photographers are looking anew at their own past.

Words by Ekow Eshun and Anastasiia FedorovaWednesday 21 February 2018